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Salopian 
"Four ever European"

Posted - 04/12/2006 :  19:49:16  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I have got a rudimentary accolade here and would like as many films for it as possible. If there are enough, I'll get rid of the fourth-wall ones, which are a separate category really. I think Blazing Saddles applies, but I haven't really seen it. What about Monty Pythin and the Holy Grail? Are those police supposed to have stumbled on the filming, or is the time in history supposed to have changed suddenly(/been modern all along)?

Edited by - Salopian on 04/12/2006 19:49:48

ChocolateLady 
"500 Chocolate Delights"

Israel

Posted - 05/12/2006 :  14:18:45  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I take it you mean this in the theatrical sense, right? Where one of the actors speaks directly to the audience. If so, you're going to have to add many more films. There are some old comedies I can think of that I believe have this, such as "A Guide to the Married Man" and "How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying" and "How to Murder your Wife". Certainly "High Fidelity" would HAVE to be on this list. Then there was that movie about the British housewife who leaves her husband and ends up in Greece - I can't remember the name of it, though. There's a scene where she's on a boat and her young greek lover is kissing her and her thoughts come through to the audience saying something like "oh my, he's kissing my stretch marks!".

There's also ones with narration such as Robert Redford narrating "A River Runs Through it". That might also make you want to include some of the Shakespere plays with soliloquies (like "Hamlet" and certainly "Much Ado about Nothing").

If you think a bit about it, this might end up being a very large accolade.
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Salopian 
"Four ever European"

Posted - 05/12/2006 :  14:29:39  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by ChocolateLady

I take it you mean this in the theatrical sense, right?

This is the breaking-the-fourth-wall case mentioned above, like Alfie. I started with Alfie because it was the earliest case I could think of off-hand. However, that is not what I mean primarily; I will just use those films if there aren't enough of the main type. The latter type is where they explicitly refer to it being a film or where filming paraphernalia is shown etc.

Edited by - Salopian on 05/12/2006 14:32:02
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ChocolateLady 
"500 Chocolate Delights"

Israel

Posted - 05/12/2006 :  14:49:57  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Well, I think you'll have enough with just the traditional definition, actually.

I'll keep thinking, but I know there are many more films like that. Most of them comedies.

However, let's not forget you'll have to include all those film noir and detective films like The Big Sleep where there's the famous "I was sitting in my office on a cold and rainy night..." type of voice over.
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BaftaBaby 
"Always entranced by cinema."

Posted - 05/12/2006 :  15:23:41  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Salopian

I have got a rudimentary accolade here and would like as many films for it as possible. If there are enough, I'll get rid of the fourth-wall ones, which are a separate category really. I think Blazing Saddles applies, but I haven't really seen it. What about Monty Pythin and the Holy Grail? Are those police supposed to have stumbled on the filming, or is the time in history supposed to have changed suddenly(/been modern all along)?



What about Day For Night or La Nuit américaine by Truffaut ... a film about making a film which reminds you it's a film [about making a film ...]

PS I think the housewife-Greek film that CL referenced stars Pauline Collins as Shirley Valentine.

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Salopian 
"Four ever European"

Posted - 05/12/2006 :  16:35:45  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by ChocolateLady

Well, I think you'll have enough with just the traditional definition, actually.

Traditional?
quote:
However, let's not forget you'll have to include all those film noir and detective films like The Big Sleep where there's the famous "I was sitting in my office on a cold and rainy night..." type of voice over.

No, those don't count. That voiceover doesn't explicitly admit that it's a film - it could easily be in their imagination or relating the story to another person at a later date.
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Salopian 
"Four ever European"

Posted - 05/12/2006 :  16:37:19  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by BaftaBabe

What about Day For Night or La Nuit américaine by Truffaut ... a film about making a film which reminds you it's a film [about making a film ...]

In what way does it do it?
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BaftaBaby 
"Always entranced by cinema."

Posted - 05/12/2006 :  16:51:44  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Salopian

quote:
Originally posted by BaftaBabe

What about Day For Night or La Nuit américaine by Truffaut ... a film about making a film which reminds you it's a film [about making a film ...]

In what way does it do it?



Because of the continual process and paraphernalia of filmmaking as well as Truffaut's own narrated observations on the process. Granted, he's playing the director of the film within the film as well as directing the actual film, but at the very least his stated observations/philosophies have a double application. It's hard to explain but when you watch it you're aware that Truffaut means you to watch the movie and to be aware of the movie-ness that you're watching. If that doesn't sound too wanky. When you're watching, it ain't, trust me! It doesn't take the expected path to what you're looking for, but it does lead to the same place. Anyway, try to get hold of it ... it's a little gem!

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Downtown 
"Welcome back, Billy Buck"

The Hub of the Universe

Posted - 05/12/2006 :  17:11:43  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Gremlins 2 definitely fits the description. There's a moment halfway through where the film cuts out because the Gremlins supposedly got into the projector room. I think this was altered for the video release but they kept the concept.

I think Kenneth Bragnagh's Henry V counts, too, because Jacobi is walking around the movie set when he gives the opening chorus.

Ferris Bueller's Day Off counts whether you're keeping "breaking the fourth wall" films or not, because after the closing credits Ferris comes out and tells the audience to "go home."
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Salopian 
"Four ever European"

Posted - 05/12/2006 :  17:20:39  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by BaftaBabe

Because of the continual process and paraphernalia of filmmaking as well as Truffaut's own narrated observations on the process. Granted, he's playing the director of the film within the film as well as directing the actual film, but at the very least his stated observations/philosophies have a double application. It's hard to explain but when you watch it you're aware that Truffaut means you to watch the movie and to be aware of the movie-ness that you're watching. If that doesn't sound too wanky. When you're watching, it ain't, trust me! It doesn't take the expected path to what you're looking for, but it does lead to the same place. Anyway, try to get hold of it ... it's a little gem!

Sounds interesting. I cannot tell whether it exactly fits with what I had in mind, but I'll (potentially) expand the premise and include it.
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Salopian 
"Four ever European"

Posted - 05/12/2006 :  17:21:15  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Downtown

Gremlins 2 definitely fits the description. There's a moment halfway through where the film cuts out because the Gremlins supposedly got into the projector room. I think this was altered for the video release but they kept the concept.

I think Kenneth Bragnagh's Henry V counts, too, because Jacobi is walking around the movie set when he gives the opening chorus.

Ferris Bueller's Day Off counts whether you're keeping "breaking the fourth wall" films or not, because after the closing credits Ferris comes out and tells the audience to "go home."


Thanks. Yes, they are all the type of thing I meant.
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lemmycaution 
"Long mired in film"

Canada

Posted - 05/12/2006 :  18:32:05  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Godard's Contempt and Keaton's Sherlock Jr.

What about The Purple Rose of Cairo?

Olsen & Johnson's Hellzapoopin'(1941) and W.C. Fields in Never Give a Sucker an Even Break (1941).
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Downtown 
"Welcome back, Billy Buck"

The Hub of the Universe

Posted - 05/12/2006 :  18:49:51  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Then there's the moment in OHMSS when Lazenby doesn't get the girl so he says, "this never happened to the other fellow," with "the other fellow" of course being Sean Connery. A character in the film is making an implied reference to another actor that played said character.
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benj clews 
"...."

United Kingdom

Posted - 05/12/2006 :  19:51:56  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
In The Life and Death of Peter Sellers, Geoffrey Rush walks out of this family sequence that turns out to be a film set. I'm not sure how much this counts, though- it was a weird, confusing film in places.
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benj clews 
"...."

United Kingdom

Posted - 05/12/2006 :  20:04:53  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The Imposters definitely fits this accolade. Pretty standard film fare until the end where everyone forms a conga line and dances off the set and out the studio.
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benj clews 
"...."

United Kingdom

Posted - 05/12/2006 :  20:06:35  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Woody Allen in the film queue in Annie Hall.
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